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20121112
20121120
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investment from the private sector. we have great resources common knowledge, and expertise in energy. in energy we have created 1 billion pounds for capture in storage, one of the key technologies of the future. we created the world's first green investment bank. we're pioneering a new incentive for heat systems in people's homes, and we are putting in place a robust financial framework to incentivize renewable electricity. as a result, more than 12 billion pounds has been committed to into renewable projects in the u.k. and the past 18 months alone with the potential to support around 20,000 new jobs. we've also created new incentives to squeeze more oil and gas out of the north sea, including from the marginal fields. when we see opportunity, we must go for it. look at the way we of got behind tech city right here in london. two years ago there were around 200 digital companies. today there are 1200. with major tech companies like amazon and facebook setting up developer centers, this is now becoming the fastest-growing technology cluster anywhere in the world. we will be publishin
prime minister confirm the government's commitment to marine renewable energy especially in the southwest? >> i think this is clearly -- marine renewable energy is clearly an area where the southwest has a real natural advantage and it's one of the many areas of renewable energy which is reflected in our diverse approach to renewable energy generation in the future because we've got to wean ourselves off an overreliance on one kind of energy vention and spread our bets more fairly and sustainably in the future. >> valerie vaz? >> thank you, mr. speaker. not only is it obama day but adoption week. my 10-minute rule bill called for equalizing statutory rights for leave, pay and allowances for adoptive parents and parents to whose children are born to them and can be done by regulations. could the deputy prime minister ask a minister to meet with me? >> i would certainly make sure that the relevant minister meet withs with her and would like to pay tribute to her for living -- for a long-standing campaign to equal the rights of parents and i believe it should be the case and
renewable energy, especially in the south was? >> renewable energy is great and a with southwest has a natural advantage. it's one of the many areas renewable energy which are reflected in our diverse approach to renewable energy generation in the future because we got to win ourselves off and over lines of one kind of energy generation. >> [inaudible] called for equalizing statutory rights for allowances between adopted parents. this can be done by regulation. so could the deputy prime minister asked a minister or two to meet with me to eliminate this unfairness? >> i was certain make sure the relevant minister meets with a. i would like to pay tribute to her former and long-standing campaign to equalize the rights of parents of the top to children to parentally for instance, to equalize that with other parents. something i certainly believe should be the case and something we'll be looking at as they can and hope we can make an announcement on that very issue in a not-too-distant future. >> will be deputy prime minister agreed a chance for initiative to get the oecd act on an inter
-- testily need -- desperately need for clean energy that will protect the planet. host: how does it work as a tax and how is it calculated? guest: day carbon tax is populated on the carbon content of the fossil fuel. coal is going to be taxed the most. natural gas the least an oil somewhere in the middle. renewables would not be taxed at all because they have no carbon in them. anything that is made with fossil fuels is one to become more expensive. that may seem like a negative, it is actually a positive. we need that pricing to bring away from transition t fossil fuel and away from 30 energy. it will make the economy more efficient and the tax -- to bring about the transition away from fossil fuel and away from dirty energy. the talk in washington in the past few weeks has been about a carbon tax of $20 per ton of carbon dioxide. that is hard to translate. it would be maybe half a cent a kilowatts in electricity and 18 cents a gallon more in the price of gasoline. that will bring about $100 million more a year in revenue. you could reform the tax code to make it more fair, more efficie
and constantly harness some of the energy around ideas and help the individuals that will be part of the party going forward. i think he'll trying to help them too. >> you were in the president with iowa an emotional place for him. give us a short picture of what it was like coming to an send in >> he's not a publically emotional guy. you're all the walk dead. it's both campaigns and every reporter but he looked out that night and saw all these faces of these people that believed in him and were with him in 2007 and i don't mean random faces but three or four people he actually recognized and knew and waived at him and waved back. that struck him and impacted him and he got emotional that night and was very reflective as it sounds like governor romney was as well. the morning of the election we were waiting to do the up teeth interview and he said his supporters believe in him as much as ours do and there's kind of this untold bond i guess i would say when you've been through this crazy journey that you have reflection for the other person, but yeah, he was pretty intro speckive. i think he di
charged three more people over the deep water horizon accident. this from environment and energy news. the justice department charged three workers involved in the deepwater horizon with various criminal violations. dd go down to amarillo, texas, merlin is waiting on the independent line. you're on the "washington journal." caller: i was just wondering how much b.p. has actually made cleaning up the spill? host: not a stat i have for you right now, merlin. i can tell you b.p. was reporting profits in the fourth quarter of 2010 after the spill occurred. profits of about $5.5 billion. the spill occurred in the summer of that year. this according to b.p.'s website. in the third quarter of 2010, b.p.'s profits were about $5 billion. in the fourth quarter of 2011, $7.6 billion in profits. caller: does anybody think that they might have did it on purpose? host: why would you think that, merlin? caller: well, because i heard that the night right before the spill they pulled out their stocks in a lot of, you know, some of the money that they had out there, they pulled out -- host: where are y
priorities. how much political capital energy was spent on health care and other things. the question is, how do you strike that balance and you see that balance changing at the go forward into the next four years? >> let me complicate your question by saying about the balance between short-term and the immediate and long-term things that matter for the strength of the economy. it is important to recognize that as we get to this next stage of this fiscal reform debate, you have to think about this not just about how you bring this deficit down gradually to the point where there sustainable. you have to think about this and the terms of what can you do to improve the long-term growth perspective of the american economy. there are a set of things we have to do in and for structure and education just to name two. that are very important to the growth potential of this country and not very expensive. if we sacrifice those objectives in the interest of getting more fiscal restraint more quickly, we will do a lot of damage. i would encourage people to look at -- we want to look at things that are g
report that the international energy agency about the country's energy production by 2020. later, we will talk about how the federal bureau of investigation and the cyber- based crimes. clark sought foreign policy scholars will discuss the relationship of the u.s. with china. we will hear from the u.s. ambassador to china. our live coverage begins tomorrow at 9:15 on c-span2. >> the mindset of the world, was into the mid 1990's that wire line access would -- with stuff on poles or in the ground was the key to understanding telecommunications. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very few people inside the industry - back- that is why the report came out the way it did. it must not just the fcc who did not understand the potential of the wireless. it was the entire industry. except for a few visionaries who were regarded as kooks. turned out to be the case was the hope that some people had that you could have a robustly competitive fixed line access industry, where a half dozen companies are offering telephone service over luetkemeyer. -- over wire. that vision was mistake
. one issue we need to face it is resource costs and energy prices, but that is not being driven by global use of the moment. it is being driven by other factors. i am not optimistic about the long-term potential growth. but is there a trade-off between what we should do to protect our elderly population and to provide adequate medical care to the whole population, and what we should do to protect our infrastructure and address energy and climate issues? no. we are underperforming on both fronts. >> it is not a budget trade- offs. as long as we think revenues can only be this high, there is a trade-off among those priorities. we have to accept having higher revenues to pay for the things we want. the softens that trade-off. impediments are not a drain on real resources. -- entitlements are not a drain on resources. they are a transfer. when we are at full capacity, we have a trade-off. the issue is, we think taxes should only be here. that was probably too low leading up to now. it is certainly too low going forward. >> your point about capital versus operating expenses -- i was
investment in energy policy not just energy politics. >> the senator was in florida for a birthday celebration and he talked on the presidential campaigns. if you missed his speech it's available at journal@cspan.org. other headlines from the chicago tribune. 25 years after the death of harold washington. are black chicagoans better off? this from the baltimore sun. something we're seeing a lot more of in major metropolitan areas. fast money. cameras are plentiful and profitable but are they accurate and reliable. baltimore sun. the richmond times focuses on the international story is expanding air strikes and hamas levelled in ga savment back to policy issues whether or not medicare and medicaid in social security should be all part of the discussion in terms of bringing down the nation's debt. bob. north carolina good morning. republican line. caller: good morning. i would like to point out whenever somebody you know suggests privatizeing the social security system. demonize this push and go people in wheelchairs over a cliff. and in fact, in galveston where they opted out they'r
our energy policy. we fix problems, we don't complain about them. everybody started coming around -- that's right, we need to start doing that. we had a one-pager about how to address the immigration problem. one page. we went to the floor of the convention, and i will tell you about the texas convention. the largest gathering of conservatives in the nation break 8000 delegates at this convention. we started walking onto the floor, and all of a sudden i see "no amnesty" stickers, and i thought we would have a nice little debate. wrong. little did i note that it was on. they called us every name in the book. we had religious conservatives testify for us. we had this the reputed dr. phil session -- therapeutic doctor full session in the subcommittee. five times they attacked our platform. specifically our one-pager. it opened a lot of people's eyes the conservatives really do understand this problem. i believe the vocal minority and has hijacked this issue and they got us all fighting and they have done that on purpose, to make of that nothing happens -- make sure nothing happens. w
energy sector. the american wind energy industry is in jeopardy. the production tax credit will end december 31, 2012. it must be extended or else 30,000 jobs will be lost and 450 manufacturing businesses will close. two additional measures must also be considered. first, we could apply the master limited partnership and the real estate investment tax programs to the green energy sector and thereby bring significant financing opportunities along with the production tax credit. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from tennessee, mrs. black, for five minutes. mrs. black: thank you, mr. speaker. while the president returned from the campaign trail last week with a slightly more conciliatory tone, his insistence on a year end tax hike on small businesses is unchanged, and frankly that is completely unacceptable. it is unacceptable for more than 23 million americans struggling for work right now. it's unacceptable for millions of middle-class americans struggling to support their families with rising gas prices an
is staying put. fred upton the chairman of the energy and commerce committee where a lot of health care and energy policy go through. the committee of jurisdiction there will be staying for another two years. and ways and -- any type of entitlement stuff. dave camp. he is not going anywhere either. where we are go to see significant committees where there will be turnover is the judiciary committee. he is term limited. he will make a bid for the science committee. he will find himself in competition. ralph hall, the chairman now is term limited. also the transportation and infrastructure committee. there are a few people who happen to have seniority but either have committee assignments or not looked upon as viable. we are passing the baton to a new generation. bill schuster is making a very strong play for the chairmanship of that. that will be just in time for congress to start to think about another reauthorization of the transportation programs, the highway bill, if you will. there is a short-term extension. they will need to revisit that in the 113th congress and representative sh
, the energy industry. all of which has constituencies behind them and are difficult to address. >> part of the president's answer to that is to not make the distinction between the corporate and the unincorporated business and raise taxes on what one of the speakers described as passed through entities. large partnerships. and that might have otherwise been corporations. >> i think there is no doubt that the corporate income tax in particular is a rickety structure in need of reform. coming about because we are in a world in which capital is increasingly mobile but we have this boundary around the corporate income tax in based on a national boundary and there is just tension contained in that phenomenon. there is dramatically different perspectives about where to move. the republican party seems much more interested in a territorial system where you get past on the profits that accrue in the united states. democrats are worried that creates even larger incentives for transfer pricing and for locating your profits overseas. and thereby escaping that tax. that is a fundamental divide. in
about opportunities in the areas of trade and energy and other global affairs that really should be taken advantage of by the united states moving forward. but we have to -- we emphasize as well there are three issues that were on an old agenda that had not been resolved and stood in the way of more productive relationship between the u.s. and latin america. these issues were drugs, cuba, and immigration. the first two issues were important at the summit of the americas. the report was released right before the summit of the americas. the first two issues were raised at the summit. the presidents get a mandate to the american states to study the drug issue and the president made it clear there would not be another summit or unlikely another summit unless there was cuban participation in the summit. those issues certain were prominent. i think the election results had interesting implications for all three of these. perhaps the most important is the last one, immigration, which was not on the summit agenda. i think it has raised some expectations that this may be a real opportunit
of the inter-american dialogue, and we talked about opportunities in the areas of trade and energy and other global affairs that really should be taken advantage of by the united states moving forward. but we have to -- we emphasize as well there are three issues that were on an old agenda that had not been resolved and stood in the way of more productive relationship between the u.s. and latin america. these issues were drugs, cuba, and immigration. the first two issues were important at the summit of the americas. the report was released right before the summit of the americas. the first two issues were raised at the summit. the presidents gave a mandate to the organization of american states to study the drug issue. and also the president made it clear there would not be another summit or unlikely another summit unless there was cuban participation in the summit. those issues certain were prominent. i think the election results had interesting implications for all three of these. perhaps the most important is the last one, immigration, which was not on the summit agenda. i think it has ra
welcome your ideas, energy, and enthusiasm. we wish you every success in your time here. i want to congratulate the president and the vice president on their hard fought victory last week. i like to say a brief word the thanks to our own nominees, governor romney and congressman ryan. they may not have won the race, but htey earned our respect and admiration. they fought valiantly for the cause of limited government, free enterprise, opportunity for all, and a stronger social safety net that is there when people need it most. they fought for the kind of constitutional conservatism americans believe in so very strongly. their lost says nothing to diminish the importance of these enduring principles or our commitment to keep fighting for them. we thank them. we thank their families for making the sacrifices in the presidential campaign demands. i want to assure everyone the cause goes on. on ot the task at hand -- in politics, there is always a temptation among those who win office to think they have a mandate to do what they will. it is the important to remember in this case the
to contaminated steroid injections in massachusetts. tomorrow, the house energy committee looks into the outbreak. bringing its eli starting at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3 and c-span radio -- it to you live starting at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3 and despair radio. >> watch book tv online ive tomorrow, streaming video from the national book awards in new york city and red carpet interviews with finalists. all online, live tomorrow at 6:00 p.m. eastern. add your comments on facebook.com/booktv. >> secretary geithner spent tuesday at the annual wall street journal ceo council meeting. this is a half hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the treasury secretary of the united states, tim geithner. [applause] the people in this room, we polled them before you got there, by two to one we do not expect a deal before we hit the fiscal cliff. there is a bit of a highlighting of the dominican republic, which we have not figured out. [laughter] i think there is a lot of anxiety in this room about the fiscal cliff. do you think we will go over it, or are you confident they will deal with the other side before we
revolution has reenergize north american energy markets and is fundamentally reshaping energy policy. if you think about drones and the war on terror and what technology has allowed, a footprints' the -- a footprint that is more effective in getting bad guys without much involvement on the ground, is the changing technological environment working to overturn established power orders or to reinforce the established power orders? david. >> as you say, this is an ebb and flow and always has been, just as the american stance of when we want to intervene and when we want to pull back has gone in a cycle. the technological flow has gone in a much faster cycle. in the past 10 years, i think it has reinforced american power. if you look at what president bush was doing in his second term and what president obama has doubled down on and triple down on in his first term, what you see is an exploitation of these technologies to try to replace traditional, on the ground kinds of wars of attrition that we have traditionally been in. drones are a great example, as you mentioned. there were 48 or 49 drawn
the private sector. we have great resources in energy. so in energy, we've committed a billion pounds for carbon capture and storage one of the key technologies of the future. we've created the world's first green investment bank. we're pioneering a new incentive for renewable heat systems in people's homes. and we're putting in place a robust framework to incentivize renewable electricity. as a result more than 12 billion pounds have been committed to new renewable projects in the u.k. in the past 18 months alone with the potential to support around 20,000 new jobs. we've also created new incentives to squeeze more oil and gas out of the north sea including from those marginal fields. look at the way we got behind tech city right here in london. two years ago, they were aren't around 200 digital companies in shortage. today there are 1,200. and with major tech companies like amazon, and facebook developing developing centers this has been the fastest growing technology cluster all around the world. we'll be publicish -- publishing articles next year with more to come this government
knowledge, and expertise in energy. in energy we have created 1 billion pounds for capture in storage, one of the key technologies of the future. we created the world's first green investment bank. we're pioneering a new incentive for heat systems in people's homes, and we are putting in place a robust financial framework to incentivize renewable electricity. as a result, more than 12 billion pounds has been committed to into renewable projects in the u.k. and the past 18 months alone with the potential to support around 20,000 new jobs. we've also created new incentives to squeeze more oil and gas out of the north sea, including from the marginal fields. when we see opportunity, we must go for it. look at the way we of got behind tech city right here in london. two years ago there were around 200 digital companies. today there are 1200. with major tech companies like amazon and facebook setting up developer centers, this is now becoming the fastest-growing technology cluster anywhere in the world. we will be publishing new strategies for aerospace and ameritech, alongside it clear, offsho
said about a clean energy job for the future. as you know that has been -- >> we are going break away from this press conference now as the u.s. house is returning for business. a quick reminder you can watch in its entirety on line at c span.org. the house is about to gavel back in. five bills to be considered. include one dealing with the natural gas pipeline for new york and new jersey. there are no votes scheduled for today. now live to the house floor, live on c-span. the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered today by our guest chaplain, rev rands donna kiefer, arizona legislative chaplainsy, peoria, arizona. the chaplain: let us pray. dear holy and righteous father, as this honored bodies of congress convenes today, we come first to humbly submit ourselves before you. acknowledging you as lord and creator. the one who directs the paths of those who call upon your precious name. savior god, we also want to thank you for your infinite grace, your divine mercy, and for the deep love that you extend to each of us. father, i ask that you faithfully have heal
-page report on the virgin islands supreme court that was submitted to the senate committee on energy and natural resources and also to the house committee on natural resources. in its review the council concluded that the virgin islands supreme court has developed sufficient institutional traditions to justify direct review by the supreme court of the united states of all final decisions. the council affirmed that the virgin islands supreme court's quality of case law was commence rat with that of the supreme court's of several states and among other remarkable reviews, stating further that the third circuit court has yet to reverse a decision of the virgin islands supreme court. i congratulate the virgin islands supreme court chief justice anlt associate justices for this extraordinary feat and i commend again the gentlelady from the virgin islands for introducing this timely legislation and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i yield myself suc
, and clean energy, putting people back to work rebuilding roads, bridges and schools and reducing our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. on this last item, we face a very clear deadline. that requires us to make some big decisions on jobs, taxes, and deficits by the end of the year. both parties voted to set this deadline. and i believe that both parties can work together to make these decisions in a balanced and responsible way. yesterday, i had a chance to meet with labor and civic leaders for their input. today i meet with c.e.o.'s of some of america's largest companies. and i'll meet with leaders of both party of congress before the week is out because there's only one way to solve the channels and that is to do it together. as i've said before, i'm open to compromise and i'm hope to new ideas. and i've been encouraged over the last week to hear republican after republican agree on the need for more revenue from the wealthiest americans as part of our arithmetic if we're serious about reducing the deficit. because when it comes to taxes, there are two pathways available. option on
to me and to the other members of the house energy and commerce committee subcommittee on energy and environment. a's testified may 4, 2010, at closed-door said giving the briefing on the bp spill. he was apparently responsible for other information subsequently provided to the subcommittee about the size of the spill. according to the plea agreement, and i quote, "as part of this plea agreement, bp has admitted that, throughout rainey, it withheld documents and provided false and misleading information in response to the united states house of representatives request for full rate information. among other things, bp admitted that he manipulated internal estimates to understate the amount of oil flowing from the well and withheld data that contradicted bp's public estimate of 5,000 barrels per day. bp has also admitted that, at the same time rainey was preparing his manipulated estimates, bp's internal engineering response teams were using methods that generated significantly higher estimates. the flow rate technical group later concluded that more than 60,000 barrels per day wer
medical schools across the country all in one night. just to see the energy for change. i think there is really this powerful movement out there, that people want to change the system, that people want to fix this problem. and then, you know, a week later we screened at the pentagon hosted by the u.s. army surgeon general. she said this film will propel us to change the way we practice medicine in this country. that's powerful stuff. what i'm most optimistic it about is that we -- i don't know if we can wait for change to happen in washington. i don't know if we can wait for national change. what i'm most optimistic about is change lapping at a local level, compluent by compluent, hospital by hospital, clinic by clinic. >> final clip for our discussion, dr. aaron martin and also dr. nissen from the cleveland clinic. >> from the commercials on television, why wait? we can just take a pill right now. >> when i watch the networks, half the ads are for pharmaceutical agents. that is not true in canada, france, or germany. the only other country, by the way is new zealand. new zealan
important, your energy here, and it shouldn't be, and it's not in this case a political issue. europe and america -- europe is going to follow this lead. are going to make this outlandish owe pass to the best of my recollection and if that word doesn't exist, i'd like suggest it to the committee of the oxford dictionary. but the opaque nature of these deals is north of the equator. because when you publish what you pay then the civil societies in those regionens get to hold their government account. that's one of the best things you can do to stimulate business and investment. thank you. >> hi, my name is -- i'm a senior in the this is close to my heart. i'm a terrible public speaker -- dish outside the -- >> sorry, i missed that. >> the whole question? >> it sounded good. [applause] >> how do we develop the global citizen in the minds of -- >> there's an amazing website you can go to called -- they are an amazing group. they just put on a concert in central park and asked u 2 to play, we couldn't but they said no problem we have all these great bands but they are really pushing this
democrat on the natural resources committee. ed markey and the ranking member on the energy and commerce committee, they're going to be talking about the b.p. settlement at 3:00 eastern. we'll take you there live once that gets under way. in the meantime a conversation from this morning's washington journal on the healthcare law and health exchanges. >> is a health policy analyst at the kaiser family foundation. looming a deadline a decision about whether or not they want to set up their own health insurance exchanges. tell us about what the exchanges are and what is the deadline about? guest: hure. exchanges are new marketplaces where people can go to purchase insurance. and the idea is to create a more competitive marketplace for the individual and small group insurance markets and to provide consumers with better information, to enable them to make informed choices about the health plans that they want to purchase. and then importantly in addition to creating this competitive marketplace, federal subsidies will be available tor individuals with incomes between 100 and 400% of the pove
would add is the america's energy futures. that is a whole different presentation. i have to get back to work. i am sure you do, too. we set out to revitalize the alliance's. we decided to engage more deeply to advance our interests. as a result, these determinations, the president ended the war in iraq. he has started a path for transition in afghanistan. and doing so, the president has dramatically improved america poses strategic freedom of maneuver so that our posture alliances -- by renewing our leadership and ensure our focus matches our priorities and resources, and a laser light focus. for the geographic part of this, the president made a decision on the outlook to increase our focus on the asian pacific in terms of resources, diplomatic efforts, engagement, both with nations and regional institutions, and in terms of policy. secateurs clinton became the first secretary of state to make her inaugural trip to asia. the first foreign leader the president met with in the oval office was the prime minister of japan. these were early and important signals of the priorities that the
movement in prices. the focus from my part of the world has been on relative prices, the price of energy, food. the level of inflation has been quite low. the division that we have is that the federal reserve is most focus on policies related to inflation. they have been addressing the situation quite well. >> if the president called you and said, i know what our economy is doing, but i do not know what the chinese economy is doing because i cannot understand their numbers? , what would you tell the president about the growth rate in china? >> that is a good question. cliff is a growing as 7%, 6.5%? -- a 7%, 6.5%? >> i have enough trouble focusing on the american economy. china's growth has been slowing down. we need to address some of the balances we have -- imbalances we have with the chinese economy. understanding the numbers, their statistical system is a challenge. >> you are a labor economist and we talked about the unemployment rate. if you are a white male with a graduate degree, what is your chance of being unemployed as opposed to a black teenager? >> certainly much lower relat
on foreign oil. and on energy and all of those things will help. but the key issue here is how do we make our labor internationally competitive? to do that you have to come up with new ideas, new tax cuts, incentives for industry and things like that. that will take some work from congress. and, you know, i feel like that is what they need to do. and it is the same old project, the same old system, it does not fit for today. is that simple. host: nancy cook. caller: that is a fascinating point. we have had these bush era tax cuts are almost over a decade now. the tricky thing about the tax code is at once you introduce changes to it, it is really hard to change them back and temporary tax cuts often become more permanent ones, and the caller raises a great point about thinking about, what should the tax code will look like rather than all of these temporary things adding up -- adding both parties are concerned. -- i think both parties are concerned. both parties say there would like to bring down the corporate tax rate to 28%. and the republicans want to do something or it would create a diff
is going into the system -- we look at this federal systems from the department of energy, department of education, in addition to this with all the hundreds of thousands of government employees, we come to april 1 or april 2, getting to the tax time and they have not had time to do in income-tax. in my briefcase i have my cd of turbo tax. i am at my government machine. i say at lunch time i will do my income taxes -- i left turbo tax on there and put my financial information. it is running on the department of education system. all that privileged and protected information. i take that the cd and go home and i stick it in my other machine and send it off to the irs. it has been on the government's system, unauthorized software, should not have done that but i did -- added material to it. i do not know what else can with it when i took it off. it is on and on. this is improper usage. not necessarily malicious intent. potentially damaging to information systems. then there is malicious code. we all know about that -- the viruses and the trojan horses. these are detected by the signatur
tax reform. we could have energy legislation. we haven't even had a defense bill or appropriations bill or cybersecurity. joe lieberman is still trying to get the cybersecurity bill which is really important for this country. really dangerous. but the president, he is our leader. he needs to engage more. we got somebody here in the room that can talk to him. i'm incurable optimist. i think he may do it. >> well, i think it's got to start in this lame-duck session that begins tomorrow. we can't adopt a total bipartisan balanceed budget agreement but we can get -- balanced budget agreement but we can get started. we can have a down payment at least to cover the first year of what otherwise would be the sequester which is $110 billion, and i think we got to prove we can do some tax reform and we can do some entitlement reform and pull it together. and then adopt a process that tries again to push the committees -- according to the regular order -- to come out with enough savings and spending, enough new revenue as part of tax reform and most critically long-term entitlement reform. t
will come together and the issues of fiscal policy, job creation and education and immigration and energy, that is no longer the looming issue of we have a re-election. that is done. barack obama has run his last campaign. you have a divided government. the one mandate the american people are sending is a mandate to work together which is focused on us. do not focus on what divides you as politicians, focus on us. i don't offer misplaced optimism often. when you are in washington you can get pessimistic really quick. but i think there is a pathway on immigration reform, a long-term debt reduction deal. continued education reform. that is really the test to the president and lead 76ers in the senate and the house. can they come together post election. for a period of time put your needs and the needs of the country first. i have a great deal of confidence that we will do that. [applause] >> thank you for having me back. it is great to be back at the university of delaware and thank you for coming. when we look at this election in 2012 republicans should not be diluted about this. this is
kind words about me. taxes is growing by leaps and bounds. this is made our country much more energy independent and has brought the price of natural gas down. i hope we can agree we don't want to reverse that and continue to go forward with these wonderful changes that have taken place in energy. we have a chance to see a renaissance in manufacturing. a lot of these jobs going overseas may come home. i have been asked and i would make three quick points. i think this election was about a lot of things. i think it is more complicated than that. i would start with the candidates. mitt romney is a good man. he wasn't as natural a communicator as the president . he had a habit of saying things that didn't help him. the president is a natural and gifted communicator. the democrats had a much better get out the vote operation. republicans need to focus on that. democrats were better in the swing states in getting at the base. the third thing is the following. 55% of moderates voted for barack obama for president. why did the republicans lose the moderates? the farther right positions gove
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
to the energy and commerce committee, you are actually lying to all of those people who are now going to bear the pain of the harm which is being done in the gold state region -- the gulf state region. >> thinking back to the time, did you know at the time -- did you have suspicions at the time that lies were being told? >> yes. we had experts who were telling us that they felt that the flow rate was much higher. we had experts who arrived who said that, if they could gain access to this billc -- to the spill cam, they would be able to determine how large the flow rate was. and determine the flow rate being more -- flow rate by being given more access to all of the different angles that the camera made it possible to observe the spill. once that happened, the experts around the country who lack access to that information dramatically -- who had access to that information dramatically increased the damage they thought was being done. it was a exponentially-higher spill rate then they had represented to us on may 4, that they had represented initially in the first week after the spill, and whic
the results. >> earlier this week, it was reported that the afghan energy and water minister and a well- known warlord from iraq called for elections in afghanistan to rearm and take up defense of the country. this seems to indicate a lack of confidence in the afghan security forces and suggesting that he would be billed his militia has raised tensions among the afghan leadership and fears other warlords and a rearmed increasing their risk -- may rearm. can you give us your assessment on his statements and the challenges rearmed malicious could pose to political >> those militias a would have an adverse affect on stability. you alluded to a lack of confidence. what is necessary is that have a compelling narrative from our country and from the afghan government. that needs to be consistent. that's something i think we need to work on here over the next couple of months to address those issues like the one you referred to like militias. >> thank you very much. senator mccain? >> chairman, i would ask senator inhofe to make a brief comment. he has responsibilities on another committee. >> thank y
have come together to outline mathematics' integral role in solving real world issues including energy freedom, medical challenges and weather events. as someone who went went on to work in renewable energy for two decades, i know that mathematics can be an essential feature to find solutions to many challenges facing humanity. mr. mcnerney: it will spotlight the importance of mathematics. the national focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education will ensure the united states remains global competitive force in the marketplace. people across our nation are working together to create a better world, and it's important their efforts be recognized and supported. i encourage my colleagues to join me in recognizing the benefits and goals of the mathematics of planet earth project. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? >> i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise to ur
and energy across-the- board themjeff, you had a press . >> , but will this be in the future? >> that is contributed and raised. i love was proud to have been on the national finance committee for the president. but weaver able to contribute with our partners and enemies li-- we endorse 233 candidates. we did well with the vast majority of them. we have losses here and there. particularly with moderate republican said did not win. i came in june and work my darnest to direct as many resources as the could and to raise outside of the building. more people notice brad pitt's contribution and more people opened his e-mails and mine. i will continue to be as aggressive as i can be. this is a turning point. this is our moment. we have to keep fighting like victoriesn thiese because the stakes are too high and the consequences of losses are significant. >> say the supreme court takes one of these cases and it is decided in our favor and 41 states have marriage equality. what do you say to the opposition's opposition the this will become the next abortion? >> if the supreme court st
, your energy costs. the good news is in terms of getting manufacturing, we're still the world's largest market. when global investors take a look at the u.s., and canada's rate is 15% and hours is 35%, where are you going to site your plant? $1.75 trillion a year, a number that is larger than all but 80 economies in the world. it is not particularly attractive. when this administration refuses to utilize our domestic energy resources, refuses the keystone pipeline which would bring jobs and energy down to america, they reject that. that is not attractive in terms of global investment and job creation. the caller also talked about what caused the deficit then been a lot of charts and graphs dispel some myths. over four years, the total deficit was 5000 $92 billion. the taxes on the wealthy over that same time was $136 billion. all other americans was $544 billion. total cost of the bush tax cuts and the wars was about $1.30 trillion which means 75% of the deficit was caused by other spending. the wars and the tax cuts certainly contributed, but 75% was caused by other spending. the wars
, transportation and gasoline is a small share of the problem. the problem is really in the energy sector. without a carbon tax, you're not directly getting at that. >> i think the carbon tax makes enormous sense to do with the environment impact of energy use. you can design one in a way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax, there are things you can do to treat the income tax to make it look more like a consumption tax. >> i want each of you to give me your thoughts at the end of the day, what do you think the tax code will look like with his conversations between the cop -- between the president speaker boehner are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some high-income tax -- and these 1 high income tax payer. i think there will be a variety of tax exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly. >> if scaled-back means capped in some way, i agree completely. rex i think we will see some of those things will back. the top rate will be either 39.6 or 35. it will be somewhere in between. >> w
are very conservative republicans. and we need to focus a lot of our energy in ensuring we win back these governors houses across the country because that's where so much damage is being done on equal pay, on women's health care, on abortion rights. this is where so much is happening and that's what we've got to go forward in the next two years. >> but you raised the governors thing we we somehow managed to avoid. thanks to the election of maggie hasan, we will have one democratic governor next year. one. do we have an executive leadership problem in the democratic party? >> no, we just had a really, really bad 2010. i would like to say, we had some great women running, and great democrats, men and women running in 2010, and we lost them. we just lost those races. but i look at 2014 and i see a increbled pool of women who are seriously considering running for governor in a whole variety of states around the country and we've got to get support around them, though. i think it's important for our party structure to realize how important these governorships are. we tend to focus on the
the president said about clean energy jobs. that has been a priority for me, and i look forward to working on those issues as we go forward. so it is about, again, a healthy, fare economy, healthy people, healthy planet, help the politics. you cannot separate the policy from the politics. if you want good -- you cannot celebrate the breadbox from the ballot box. if you want the right policy for america's working families, you must have politics that are fair and enable people who share those values to be effective. so in order to reignite the american dream, that is what we are about, to build ladders of opportunity for those who want to work hard, play by the rules, take responsibility, for small business and entrepreneurship and a strong and thriving middle-class -- we have work to do. i have made a decision to submit my name to my colleagues to once again serve as the house democratic leader. [applause] i am so proud to stand here with you, my sisters. a lot of our friends really wanted to come out here -- this is a girls' morning. any questions? >> was there ever a moment that you cons
the energy to be here. and help people put a face on this. there is a role of these agencies. and that no time should ever someone say this is a gray area, i don't want to overstep the boundaries. because the fact that people did that ended up in a tragic loss. so i thank you for having the courage to be here and helping to put a face on it. thank you. >> do you swear to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth so help you god? >> i do. >> thank you. i will recognize myself for the first part of the question. mr. caden are you the one of the owners of the new england compounding center or necc the company that distributed contaminated injectables to medical clinics doctors offices and hospitals across this country? >> on advice of counsel i respectfully decline to answer on the bases of my constitutional rights and privileges including the fifth amendment to the united states constitution. >> mr. caden, 32 people have died. 400 people are infected and scores of others who were injected with medicine your company compoundred waiting holding their breath to see if they'll
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